Alexanders

AlexanderAlexanders are among the first umbellifers to grace the verges and hedges of the Lizard in spring. The soft greeny-yellow of their umbels contrasts with the rich yellow of the gorse, proving that plants don't have to be rare to be beautiful.
Photo: Ray Surridge

Autumn Lady's-tresses

Autumn Lady's-tresses (Steve Townsend)You may be lucky and find the last blooms of this lovely, and relatively rare, member of the orchid family into October.
Photo: Steve Townsend 

Autumn Squill

As the swallows prepare to leave in the early autumn, delicate blooms of Autumn Squill appear on The Lizard.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Barren Strawberry

Barren StrawberrySimilar at first glance to Wild Strawberry, the pretty Barren Strawberry can be found flowering earlier, from February through to May. 
Photo: Amanda Scott

Betony

BetonyPurple spikes of Betony put on a lovely display along coastal paths in the summer.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Bird's-foot-trefoil

If you ever wondered how Bird’s-foot-trefoil got its name, you have to wait for the seedpods to appear in late summer.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Black Bryony

Black Bryony, Cornwall, The Lizard, the-lizard.orgAutumn is setting in, which means it’s almost berry season! You can look forward to Elder, Hawthorn, Holly, and the lovely but poisonous red berries of Black Bryony (pictured).
Photo: Dougy Wright

 

Black Medick

Black Medick seedpodsIn the autumn, look out for the distinctive black seedpods that give Black Medick, a cousin to the clovers, its name.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Black Nightshade

Black NightshadeLook out for the white flowers and bright yellow stamens of Black Nightshade on waste ground and nutrient-rich soils, still blooming in the milder weather.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Blackthorn

They may be called 'the darling buds of May, but the Cornish climate means Blackthorn flowers, appearing in glorious masses in the hedgerows, are usually finished here well before May arrives. 
Photo: Steve Townsend

Bloody Crane's-bill

Bloody Crane's-bill (photo by Steve Townsend)The meadows above Kynance Cove are a good place to see Bloody Crane’s-bill in the summer, following recent habitat restoration and scrub clearance.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Blue Roundhead

Blue RoundheadUsually associated with summer and autumn, this beautiful Blue Roundhead toadstool was spotted recently, hanging on despite the colder weather.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Bluebells

BluebellYou know it is spring when bluebells start to bloom. 
Photo: Amanda Scott

Bog Asphodel

Bog AsphodelThis bright plant of heathland puts on an amazing display in early summer.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Bristly Oxtongue

 Bristly OxtongueIt may not be the prettiest of plants, but Bristly Oxtongue, which flowers from June into the autumn, has some impressive spikes on its leaves.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Burnet Rose

Burnet Rose

Creamy-white Burnet Roses are everywhere on the coastal heaths from May through to July.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Butcher's-broom

Interesting name, unusual plant – watch out for the small green flowers in late winter and the large red berry fruits between October and May. Kennack Sands is a good place to find this plant.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Carline Thistle

Carline Thistle, The Lizard, Cornwall, Kennack SandsLate-flowering Carline Thistles bring a touch of gold to the early autumn landscape at Kennack Sands. The dry flowerheads persist through the winter.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Chamomile

Chamomile blooms from mid-summer, carpeting and scenting grassy fields on the Lizard. 
Photo: Amanda Scott

 

Common Butterwort

Common ButterwortThe delicate violet flowers of Common Butterwort can be spotted from May to July in boggier spots on The Lizard.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Common Centaury

With a long flowering period from June to October, the pink flowers of Common Centaury can be found across the Lizard from summer to autumn.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Common Dog-violet

Common Dog-violetNot the prettiest name for a very pretty flower...Common Dog-violets start to bloom in early Spring, with a second flush in late Summer.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Common Fleabane

From August to September, the golden flowers of Common Fleabane brighten up damp meadows and stream edges on the Lizard.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Common Knapweed

A valuable source of nectar for insects in late summer, Common Knapweed is found on the grasslands and scrub of The Lizard from July to September.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Common Milkwort

The grassy cliff tops of the Lizard are full of Common Milkwort in summer – the coastal path between Coverack and Lowland Point is a good place to spot this delicate, pretty plant.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Common Scurvygrass

ScurvygrassFrom May to August, Common Scurvygrass can be found along the clifftops of The Lizard.

Cornish Heath

 Cornish Heath, The Lizard, CornwallThe lovely Cornish Heath, in Great Britain only found growing naturally on the serpentine rocks of The Lizard, starts to flower in mid-summer. 

Photo: Amanda Scott

Creeping Buttercup

Creeping Buttercup (photo by Steve Townsend)Not much beats a meadow full of golden buttercups.
Photo: Steve Townsend 

Cuckooflower

Cuckooflower (photo by Steve Townsend)The flushed pink flowers of Cuckooflower can be spotted in damp meadows and on stream banks in the spring.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Devil's-bit Scabious

Devil's-bit ScabiousNoted for being the larval food plant of the nationally rare Marsh Fritillary butterfly, Devil’s-bit Scabious is lovely in its own right. You can find it flowering on Mullion Cliffs in late summer into autumn. 
Photo: Steve Townsend

Dodder

DodderWatch out for the red stems of the parasitic plant Dodder scrambling over gorse and heather. It flowers between July and September.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons (see below for full attribution)

Dog's Mercury

Found mainly in woodlands and hedgerows, Dog's Mercury is far from showy, but is distinguished by being one of the earlier plants to flower each year.
Photo: Steve Townsend

 

Dropwort

Dropwort is a lover of basic soils, and can be found blooming on the serpentine of the Lizard Peninsula from May to August.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Dryad's Saddle

Dryad's Saddle (photo by Ray Surridge)Damp weather is annoying for humans, but good for fungi, like this Dryad’s Saddle, a common bracket fungus on dead and decaying wood.
Photo: Ray Surridge

Dyer's Greenweed

Dyer's GreenwoodThe yellow flowers of Dyer’s Greenweed can be seen on the Lizard from June to August. The cliffs near Kynance Farm are a good place to look.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Early Forget-me-not

Early Forget-me-notIn the spring, look out for the tiny and delicate blue flowers of Early Forget-me-not nestling on sandy cliff-top and heathland soils round the Lizard.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Early-purple Orchid

Early-purple Orchids enjoy the serpentine soils of the Lizard.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Earthtongues

EarthtonguesThere are nine species of Earthtongues in the UK. Often overlooked, they are an important indicator of ancient unimproved grassland.
Photo: Steve Townsend

English Stonecrop

Carpets of English Stonecrop flower from June to September on the rocks of the Lizard.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Evening-primrose

Evening-primroseEvening-primrose can be spotted into the autumn in milder weather.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Fairy Fingers

Fairy Fingers (photo: Steve Townsend)In autumn, Fairy Fingers delicately probe their way through grassland and woodland litter.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Field Gentian

Field GentianThe lovely violet flowers of Field Gentian are a rarity. More common in the north of the UK, they are found in a small handful of places on The Lizard in late summer, including old trackways across the heaths.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Field Madder

Field MadderThe books say that Field Madder flowers until October, but it is often still hanging in there into November on The Lizard.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Fly Agaric

Fly Agaric, CornwallIt’s the picturebook ‘pixie toadstool’ – and there’s lots of it about in the autumn. Look for it in woodland.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Fragrant Orchid

Fragrant Orchid (photo by Steve Townsend)Fragrant Orchids are close to the end of flowering by July, but they (and their lovely scent) still linger on in some spots on The Lizard.
Photo: Steve Townsend 

Fringed Rupturewort

Fringed Rupturewort, one of the rare plants of the Lizard, can be seen in sandy and rocky habitats. A small, unassuming plant, look for its brighter green colouring among the surrounding vegetation.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Golden Hair-lichen

Golden Hair-lichenIt is always a pleasure to find the rare and beautiful Golden Hair-lichen. Kynance is a good place to search.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons (see below for full attribution)

Green-winged Orchid

 Windmill Farm is a good place to look for Green-winged Orchids.
Photo: Steve Townsend

Hairy Beech Gall

Hairy Beech GallHairy Beech Galls, induced by a parasitic gall-midge, are one of the galls found on our native beech trees. Head to our section on invertebrates to find out more.
Photo: Amanda Scott

Hairy Curtain Crust

Hairy Curtain CrustA fungus of dead wood from broadleaf trees, Hairy Curtain Crust can be found throughout the year. This colony was spotted on fallen oak at Penrose.
Photo: Amanda Scott

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